Posts tagged "gentoo":

25 Dec 2019

How to fix early framebuffer problems, or "Can I type my disk password yet??"

Most of my workstations & laptops require a passphrase typed in to open the encrypted root filesystem. So my steps to booting are as follows:

  1. Power on machine
  2. Wait for FDE passphrase prompt
  3. Type in FDE passphrase
  4. Wait for boot to complete and automatic XFCE session to start

Since I need to know when the computer is ready to accept the passphrase, it is important the framebuffer is usable during the early part of the boot. In the case of of HP Elitebook 820 G4, the EFI framebuffer does not appear to work, and I rather not boot in BIOS mode to get a functional VESA framebuffer. Making things more awkward, a firmware is needed when the i915 driver is loaded, or the framebuffer will not work either. (It’s not always clear if a firmware is needed, so one should run dmesg | grep -F firmware and check if firmware is being loaded.)

With this information, the problem is summarized to: “How do I ensure i915 is available at boot with the appropriate firmware?”. This question can be easily generalized to any framebuffer driver, as the steps are more-or-less the same.

Zeroth step: Do you need only a driver, or a driver with firmware?

IT is a good idea to verify if your kernel is missing a driver at boot, or is missing firmware or both. Boot up a Live USB with good hardware compatibility, such as GRML1 or Ubuntu’s, and let’s see what framebuffer driver our host is trying to use2:

$ dmesg | grep -i 'frame.*buffer'
[    4.790570] efifb: framebuffer at 0xe0000000, using 8128k, total 8128k
[    4.790611] fb0: EFI VGA frame buffer device
[    4.820637] Console: switching to colour frame buffer device 240x67
[    6.643895] i915 0000:00:02.0: fb1: i915drmfb frame buffer device

Se we can see the efifb is initially used for a couple seconds, then i915 is used for the rest of the computer’s uptime. Now let’s look at if firmware is necessary, first checking if modinfo(8) knows of any firmware:

$ modinfo i915 -F firmware
i915/bxt_dmc_ver1_07.bin
i915/skl_dmc_ver1_27.bin
i915/kbl_dmc_ver1_04.bin
... SNIP ...
i915/kbl_guc_33.0.0.bin
i915/icl_huc_ver8_4_3238.bin
i915/icl_guc_33.0.0.bin

This indicates this driver will load firmware when available, and if necessary for the particular mode of operation or hardware.

Now let’s look at dmesg to see if any firmware is loaded:

[    0.222906] Spectre V2 : Enabling Restricted Speculation for firmware calls
[    5.511731] [drm] Finished loading DMC firmware i915/kbl_dmc_ver1_04.bin (v1.4)
[   25.579703] iwlwifi 0000:02:00.0: loaded firmware version 36.77d01142.0 op_mode iwlmvm
[   25.612759] Bluetooth: hci0: Minimum firmware build 1 week 10 2014
[   25.620251] Bluetooth: hci0: Found device firmware: intel/ibt-12-16.sfi
[   25.712793] iwlwifi 0000:02:00.0: Allocated 0x00400000 bytes for firmware monitor.
[   27.042080] Bluetooth: hci0: Waiting for firmware download to complete

Aha! So it appears we need i915/kbl_dmc_ver1_04.bin for i915. In the case case one doesn’t need firmware, it won’t show anything related to drm or a line with your driver name in it.

By the way, it is a good idea to check dmesg for hints about missing firmware, or alternative drivers, for example my trackpad is supported by both i2c and synaptics based trackpad drivers, and the kernel was kind enough to tell me.

First step: Obtain the firmware

On Gentoo install sys-kernel/linux-firmware. You will have to agree to some non-free licenses; nothing too inane, but worth mentioning. Now just run emerge -av sys-kernel/linux-firmware. (On other distros it might be this easy, or more difficult; for example—in my experience Debian does not ship every single firmware like Gentoo does, so YMMV.)

Second step, Option A: Compile firmware into your kernel

Since most of my systems run Gentoo, it is business as usual to deploy a kernel with most excess drivers disabled except for common hot-swappable components such as USB network interfaces, audio devices, and so on. For example, this laptop’s config was originally derived from genkernel’ stock amd64 config with most extra drivers disabled, then augmented with support for an Acer ES1-111M-C7DE, and finally with support for this Elitebook.

I had compiled the kernel with i915 support built into the image, as opposed to an additional kernel module. Unfortunately this meant the kernel is unable to load firmware from filesystem, because it appears only kernel modules can load firmware from filesystem. To work around this without resorting to making i915 a kernel module, we can include the drivers within the kernel image (vmlinuz). Including firmware and drivers both in the vmlinuz has a couple benefits. First it will always be available. There is no need to figure out how to load the driver and firmware from initrd, let alone getting the initrd generator one is using, to cooperate. A downside is it makes the kernel very specific to the machine, because perhaps a different Intel machine needs a different firmware file compiled in.

To achieve including the firmware in kernel, I set the following values in my kernel config (.config in your kernel source tree).

CONFIG_EXTRA_FIRMWARE="i915/kbl_dmc_ver1_04.bin"
CONFIG_EXTRA_FIRMWARE_DIR="/lib/firmware"

Note, if you’re using menuconfig, you can type /EXTRA_FIRMWARE (slash for search, then the text) followed by keyboard return to find where these settings exist in the menu system.

Then I verified i915 is indeed not a kernel module, but built into the kernel image (it would be m if it’s a module):

CONFIG_DRM_I915=y

After compiling & installing the kernel (and generating a dracut initrd for cryptsetup/lvm), I was able to reboot and get an early pre-mounted-root framebuffer on this device.

Second step, Option B: A portable kernel approach (using sys-kernel/vanilla-kernel)

I discovered the Gentoo devs have begun shipping an ebuild that builds and installs a kernel with a portable, livecd friendly config. In addition this package will optionally generates an initrd with dracut as a pkgpostinst step, making it very suitable as a replacement for users who just want a working kernel, and don’t mind a excessive compatibility (at a cost to size and build time).

This presents a different challenge, because while this package does allow the user to drop in their own .config, it is not very multiple-machine-deployment friendly to hard-code each individual firmware into the kernel. Instead we tell dracut to include our framebuffer driver. As mentioned above I found this computer uses the i915 kernel driver for framebuffer. Let’s tell dracut to include the driver:

cat > /etc/dracut.conf.d/i915.conf <<EOF
add_drivers+=" i915 "
EOF

Dracut is smart enough to pick up the firmware the kernel module needs, provided they are installed. To get an idea what firmware dracut will include, run modinfo i915 -F firmware which will print out a bunch of firmware relative paths.

After applying this fix, just regenerate your initrd using dracut; in my case I let portage do the work: emerge -1av sys-kernel/vanilla-kernel. Finally reboot.

Conclusion

Check dmesg. Always check dmesg. We found two ways to deploy firmware, in-kernel and in-initrd. The in-kernel technique is best for a device-specific kernel, the in-initrd is best for a portable kernel. I am a big fan of the second technique because it scales well to many machines.

I did not touch on the political side of using binary blobs. It would be nice to not use any non-free software, but I rather have a working system with a couple small non-free components, than a non-working system. Which is more valuable, your freedom, or reduced capacity of your tools?

Footnotes:

1

GRML is my favorite live media. It is simple, to the point, has lots of little scripts to streamline tasks such as setting up a wireless AP, a iPXE netboot environment, a router, installing debian, and so on. And Remastering is relatively straight forward. It also has a sane gui sutable for any machine (fluxbox).

2

Thanks to this post on Ask Ubuntu

Tags: gentoo linux computing
28 Jul 2019

Open URL in existing Qutebrowser from Emacs Daemon on Gentoo

On my Gentoo desktops, I use Emacs Daemon via sys-emacs/emacs-daemon1 to ensure an Emacs instance is ready to go and always available from boot. This is done via creating a symbolic link like /etc/init.d/emacs.winston to /etc/init.d/emacs which will start Emacs for the given user. See the package README for more details.

A shortcoming of this setup is XDG_RUNTIME_DIR2 is not set, as this is set by my Desktop Session - maybe LightDM or consolekit set this? As a result, when I open a URL from Emacs Daemon, it opens a fresh qutebrowser session, loading the saved default session, and making a mess of my workflow.

One approach to fix this might be to instead run Emacs daemon from my .xsession script, but I rather not supervise daemons at the user level; if I were to consider this, I'd be better off to switch to systemd for user-level services anyway.

The solution I came up with is to add some lines to my init.el to ensure XDG_RUNTIME_DIR is set to the expected value:

(defun winny/ensure-XDG_RUNTIME_DIR ()
  "Ensure XDG_RUNTIME_DIR is set. Used by qutebrowser and other utilities."
  (let ((rd (getenv "XDG_RUNTIME_DIR")))
    (when (or (not rd) (string-empty-p rd))
      (setenv "XDG_RUNTIME_DIR" (format "/run/user/%d" (user-uid))))))

(add-hook 'after-init-hook #'winny/ensure-XDG_RUNTIME_DIR)

A strange emacs-ism: (user-uid) returns float or integer, despite the backing uid_t (on *nix) is guarenteed to be an integer type. I'll just assume this'll never return a float. Please contact me otherwise, I'd love to hear about this.

Footnotes:

Tags: emacs productivity computing gentoo qutebrowser
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© Winston Weinert (winny) — CC-BY-SA-4.0